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H. Munro (Saki) (1870-1916)
He is one of those people who would be enormously improved by death.
 
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The Book of the Archer
The Principles of Discordian Magick
Energy
The Concept of Order
Applied Magick
Advanced I Ching: The Structure of a Well- Ordered Family
Alchemy is alive and Well
Thoth and The Book of Thoth - The Myths behind the Legend
The Tree of Life & Frater Achad
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  Six Principles of Magic
1. Every magician has a beautiful vision for the world.
2. Every system of magic is a single artists tool, used to reshape reality.
3. If you believe, it shall exist.
4. When you call, they will answer.
5. Success and failure, is one and the same: ignorance and depression is the enemy.
6. Be like all equally, and you shall unite; refuse and separate.

by Dalamar
 
  Mythology of THOTH
Thoth Egyptian God
Discover more about the myth and legend of Thoth & The Book of THOTH
 
14. MISCELLANEOUS UTTERANCES ON THE CAREER OF THE DECEASED KING IN THE

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14. MISCELLANEOUS UTTERANCES ON THE CAREER OF THE DECEASED KING IN THE HEREAFTER, 317-337.

Utterance 317.

507a. To say: N. is come forth to-day at the head of the inundation of the flood.

507b. N. is a crocodile god, with green feather, with vigilant countenance, with forehead erect;

507c. effervescent, proceeding from leg and tail of the Great (One) who is in splendour.

508a. N. is come to his watercourses, which are in the land of the flood, in Mḥ.t-wr.t,

508b. to the places of satisfaction, with green fields, which are in the horizon,

509a. that N. may make green the herbs in both lands of the horizon,

509b. (and) that N. may bring the green to the great eye which is in the midst of the field.

509c. N. takes his throne which is in the horizon;

510a. N. appears as Sebek, son of Neit;

510b. N. eats with his mouth, N. urinates, N. cohabits with his phallus;

510c. N. is lord of semen, which women receive from their husband.

510d. wherever N. wishes, according to the desire of his heart,

Utterance 318.

511a. To say: N. is the n‘w-serpent, the bull which leadeth, which swallowed its seven uraeus-serpents,

511b. through which came into being its seven neck-vertebrae,

511c. which commands its Seven Enneads who hear the words of the king.

511d. And the mother of N. is Ḥnw.t; N. is her son.

512a. N. has come that he may swallow myrrh,

512b. that N. may take myrrh, his nostrils (?) being full of myrrh; the finger-nail of N. being full of myrrh.

512c. N. has taken away your neck, O gods;

512d. Serve N. who will confer (upon you) your valour.

Utterance 319.

513a. To say: N. is the bull of the two splendours which are in the middle of his eye.

513b. The mouth of N. is immune because of a flaming breath, the head of N. because of horns, (as) lord of the South (Haroëris of Ḳuṣ).

513c. N. leads the god; N. rules over the Ennead.

5 1 3d. N. makes the lapis lazuli grow; N. causes the Upper Egyptian twn-plant to sprout.

514a. N. has tied the cords of the šmšm.t-plant.

514b. N. has united the heavens; N. rules over the lands, the southern and the northern,

514c. (as) the gods who were before.

514d. N. built a divine city, according to its merits.

514e. N. is the third in his dawning.

Utterance 320.

515a. To say: N. has regulated the night; N. has sent the hours on their way.

515b. The powers (stars) dawn; they proclaim N. as Bȝ-bii.

515c. N. is that son of her who knew not that

515d. she had borne N., to him of powerful visage, as lord of nights.

516a. Humble (?) yourselves, ye lords; hide yourselves, ye subjects, in the presence of N.,

516b. (for) N. is Bȝ-bii, lord of night,

516c. the bull, without whom life would cease.

p. 110

Utterance 321.

517a. To say: O Thou-whose-back-is-behind-him, bring to N. the śfr.t-ḥtp.t, which was upon the back of Osiris,

517b. that N. may ascend to heaven upon it; that N. may do service of courtier to Rē‘ in heaven.

Utterance 322.

518a. To say: Heaven is open; earth is open.

518b. The double doors of śȝt are open to Horus; the double doors of šȝ b.wt are open to Set.

518c. Turn thou for him as he who is in his fortress; N. has passed over you (šȝb.wt) as Atum.

518d. N. is Ḫ‘ii-tȝw, who is (lives?) in the midst of the Ngȝ-mountains.

Utterance 323.

519a. To say: N. has purified himself with Rē‘ in the sea of reeds.

519b. Horus dries thy skin, O N.; Thot dries thy feet, O N.

519c. Shu, lift N. up on high; Nut, give thine arm to N.

Utterance 324.

520a. To say: Greetings to thee, doorkeeper of Horus, who art at the portal of Osiris,

520b. announce now the name of N. there to Horus,

521a. (for) he is come with temple-saliva for this his temple (of the head),

521b. which is painful at the [beginning] of the months, which becomes bald at the beginning of half months.

521c. Wilt thou cool it with the magic, [which thou didst make for the Great One] among the gods,

521d. in his former state, which is come upon him?

522a. Greetings to thee, O hippopotamus, from everlasting.

522b. [Art] thou [come] to N. as hippopotamus from everlasting,

522c. after he had brandished one of the two ȝmś-clubs of Horus against thee and slain thee therewith?

522d. Greetings to thee in his former state, which is come upon him.

523a. Greetings to thee, [braying] ass.

523b. Art thou come to N. as a braying ass,

p. 111

523c. after he had slain thee with the ----- tail, [which grows] in the sea of Osiris?

524a. Greetings to thee, O Khnum, who was made harmless though he built N.

524b. Thou art his ‘m‘-plant, which his foot [trod upon],

524c. which cannot straighten up under his toes.

524d. Thou art one of the two ’iwn-pillars of the great palace.

Utterance 325.

525a. To say: The double doors of heaven are open; the double doors of ḳbḥ.w are open

525b. for Horus of the gods, at daybreak,

525c. that he may ascend in the Marsh of Reeds and purify himself in the Marsh of Reeds.

526a. The double doors of heaven are open; the double doors of ḳbḥ.w are open

526b. for Harachte at daybreak,

526c. that he may ascend in the Marsh of Reeds and purify himself in the Marsh of Reeds.

527a. The double doors of heaven are open; the double doors of ḳbḥ.w are open

527b. for Horus of the East at daybreak,

527c. that he may ascend in the Marsh of Reeds and purify himself in the Marsh of Reeds.

528a. The double doors of heaven are open; the double doors of ḳbḥ.w are open

528b. for Horus of the Šsm.t-land at daybreak,

528c. that he may ascend in the Marsh of Reeds, and purify himself in the Marsh of Reeds.

529a. The double doors of heaven are open; the double doors of ḳbḥ.w are open

529b. for N. himself at daybreak

529c. that he may ascend in the Marsh of Reeds and purify himself in the Marsh of Reeds.

530a. N. is clean; he takes his lasting (copper?) bones;

530b. he has stretched out his imperishable limbs, which were (or, are) in the body of his mother Nut.

531a. Rē‘, give thine arm to N.

531b. Shu will draw him up to the "Companions of Shu,"

p. 112

531c. after he has caused N. to be nourished with the milk of two black cows, the two nurses of the Souls of Heliopolis.

532a. O Hpȝt, it is grevious for the body of Nut, because of the fury of the divine seed, which shall be in her.

532b. Behold also N.--N. is a divine seed which shall be in her.

533a. Hpȝt, Hnn, Smnn.w,

533b. N. is purified. He has taken his divine śwḥ-vestment,

533c. that N. may establish himself there as a god like them.

533d. Hpȝt, Hnn, Smnn.w,

533e. Take N. away; let him remain with you.

Utterance 326.

534a. To say: Collar, beloved of Horus, good-looking, which is on the neck of Rē‘.

534b. If thou goest to heaven; so will N. go to heaven.

Utterance 327.

535a. To say: The messenger of Horus, whom he loves, was N., who has brought back to him his eye.

535b. The messenger of Set, whom he loves, was N., who has brought back to him his testicles.

535c. The messenger of Thot, whom he loves, was N., who has brought back to him his arm.

536a. The Two Enneads tremble for themselves,

536b. for they are the messengers, whom N. loves, who should bring N. to food.

536c. They bring N. to food.

Utterance 328.

537a. To say: N. is the exalted, who is in the forefront, who lifts up the brow;

537b. the star before which the gods bow, before which the Two Enneads tremble.

537c. It is the hand of N. which will lift him (N.) up.

Utterance 329.

538a. N. is the exalted, who is in the forefront; who lifts up the brow;

538b. the star before which the gods bow, before which the Two Enneads tremble.

p. 113

538c. The face of N. is the face which sees his elevation.

538d. N. is a nose which breathes.

Utterance 330.

539a. To say: N. ascends to heaven on (or, above, or, through) the šdšd, which was at the separation,

539b. after its (the heaven's) sole (of the foot) was seized by the up-reached hand.

Utterance 331.

540a. To say: N. ascends to heaven on the šdšd, which was at the separation,

540b. after its sole (of the foot) was seized.

540c. N. is a nose which breathes;

540d. the face of N. is the face which sees his elevation.

Utterance 332.

541a. To say: this N. is he who comes forth from the mḥn-jar.

541b. N. has ascended as his warm breath and has returned.

541c. N. has gone, O heaven, O heaven; N. has returned, O earth, O earth.

541d. N. has walked upon the green ḳȝd-herb under the feet of Geb;

541e. he treads (again) upon the paths of Nut.

Utterance 333.

542a. To say: N. purified himself upon that appearing (-mound) of the earth, on which Rē‘ purified himself;

542b. he placed a ḥb-’ib-stand and he set up the ladder.

542c. Those who are in the great (heaven), they will take the arm of N.

Utterance 334.

543a. To say: Greetings to thee, O Rē‘, traverser of heaven, voyager through Nut.

543b. Thou hast traversed the Winding Watercourse.

543c. N. has grasped thy tail; as to N., he is indeed a god, the son of a god.

544a. N. is a flower, which comes out of the ka,

544b. a golden flower, which comes out of Ntr.w.

544c. N. has traversed Buto; he has voyaged through Knm.wt.

p. 114

545a. N. has traversed Buto as Hrti, ruler of Nsȝ.t.

545b. He has voyaged through Knm.wt as Šsm.w, who is in his ship of the oil-press. May the god be pleased

545c. that N. live as Ftk.t lives!

Utterance 335.

546a. To say: How beautiful is, the sight of N., adorned with the horns of Rē‘,

546b. his apron on him like Hathor, his feather like the feather of a falcon,

546c. when (or, as) he ascends to heaven among his brothers, the gods!

Utterance 336.

547a. To say: Greeting to thee, ox of the oxen, when thou makest the ascension.

547b. N. seizes thee by thy tail; N. takes thee by thy buttocks.

547c. When thou makest the ascension, a Great One is behind thee, a Great One is before thee.

548a. Greetings to thee, Great One among the gods, take N. to thee, he belongs to thee.

548b. Thy heart is whole; as to the parts of the corpse of N., they are young.

Utterance 337.

549a. To say: Heaven speaks, the earth quakes on account of thy fear, Osiris,

549b. when thou makest the ascension.

550a. O ye milk-cows there, O ye nurse-cows there,

550b. go around him, weep for him, praise him, lament for him,

550c. when he makes the ascension. He goes forth to heaven among his brothers, the gods.


  

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