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We have art to save ourselves from the truth.
 
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The Book of the Archer
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  Six Principles of Magic
1. Every magician has a beautiful vision for the world.
2. Every system of magic is a single artists tool, used to reshape reality.
3. If you believe, it shall exist.
4. When you call, they will answer.
5. Success and failure, is one and the same: ignorance and depression is the enemy.
6. Be like all equally, and you shall unite; refuse and separate.

by Dalamar
 
  Mythology of THOTH
Thoth Egyptian God
Discover more about the myth and legend of Thoth & The Book of THOTH
 
15. OFFERINGS FOR THE DECEASED KING, UTTERANCES 338-349

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15. OFFERINGS FOR THE DECEASED KING, UTTERANCES 338-349.

Utterance 338.

551 a. To say: Hunger, come not to N.,

551b. go away to Nun, be off (begging) to the ȝgbi-flood.

551c. N. is sated;

p. 115

551d. N. hungers not by reason of that bread of Horus which he has eaten,

551e. which his head-maid made for him, with which he is satisfied, (and) whereby he wins back his (normal) condition.

552a. N. thirsts not by reason of Shu; N. hungers not by reason of Tefnut.

552b. Ḥpi, Dwȝ-mw.t.f, Ḳbḥ-śn.w.f, ’Imś.ti,

552c. they will expel this hunger, which is in the body of N.,

552d. and this thirst which is on the lips of N.

Utterance 339.

553a. To say: The hunger of N. is from the hand of Shu; the thirst of N. is from the hand of Tefnut.

553b. N. lives on the morning bread, which comes at its (appointed) time.

553c. N. lives on that on which Shu lives;

553d. N. eats, that which Tefnut eats.

Utterance 340.

554a. N. comes to thee, Nḫḫ;

554b. mayest thou fall back before N., as the east wind falls back before (behind?) the west wind;

554c. mayest thou come behind N., as the north wind comes behind the south wind.

554d. To say: Deposit (an offering?).

Utterance 341.

555a. To say: The face of Horus is opened by ȝkr; the face of ȝkr is opened by Horus.

555b. Abundance has extended her arm to N.;

555c. The arms of N. have embraced fowling.

555d. All which the marsh produces belongs to her son, Ḥȝb.

555e. N. has eaten with him to-day.

Utterance 342.

556a. To say: It is N., O Isis; it is N., O ȝśb.t; it is N., O Nephthys.

556b. Come, see thy son.

556c. He has passed through the nome of Athribis, after he has passed through the (region of the) wrr.t-crown.

557a. The handbag of N. is of twn-plant;

p. 116

557c. N. comes; he brings what is desired and what is given.

557b. the basket of N. is of nn.t-plant.

Utterance 343.

558a. To say: Bdš.t comes; the fire-pan burns.

558b. Those with (ready) hands stand to give an offering to N.

Utterance 344.

559a. To say: Greetings to thee, O Great Flood (ȝgb-wr),

559b. cup-bearer of the gods, leader of men,

559c. mayest thou make men and gods favourable to N., that they may give an offering to him.

Utterance 345.

560a. To say: O Wr-kȝ.f,

560b. cup-bearer of Horus, chief of the dining-pavillion of Rē‘, chef of Ptaḥ,

560c. give generously to N.; N. eats as much as thou givest.

Utterance 346.

561a. To say: Kas are in Buto; kas were in Buto as of old.

561b. Kas will be in Buto; the ka of N. is in Buto,

561c. red as a flame, living as Khepri.

561d. Be cheerful, be cheerful. A meal (fit) for butchers.

562a. It is now thou givest, my lady, love to N., veneration to N.;

562b. it is now thou givest, my lady, veneration to N., liking to N.,

562c. in the body of all gods.

Utterance 347.

563a. To say: The mouth of N. is in incense; the lips of N. are in myrrh.

563b. Descend, O N., from the field of thy ka to the Marsh of Offerings.

563c. of N. is from the n‘r.t; the meal of N. is like (that of) the divine boat.

564a. The life of N. will be more than that of Rnp.t; the food of N. will be more than (that of) Ḥpi (the inundation).

564b. O ka of N., bring (food) that N. may eat with thee.

p. 117

Utterance 348.

565a. To say: Greeting to thee, O Great Flood,

565b. cup-bearer of the gods, leader of men,

565c. mayest thou make the gods favourable to N., that they may . refresh N.,

565d. that they may love N., that they may render N. well.

Utterance 349.

566a. To say: O Wr-kȝ.f.

566b. cup-bearer of Horus, chief of the dining-pavillion of Rē‘, chef of Ptaḥ,

566c. give generously to N.; N. eats as much as thou givest, a generous portion of his meat.


  

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